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Laser ray is 50 years old

Author: veronique  |  Category: Science
Published: April 3, 2010

When the American physicist Theodore Maiman turned it on for the first time in 1960, many colleagues laughed at him for his invention. But if they were here today, 50 years after the production of the first laser instrument, they would see it everywhere: form supermarket check-out to dvd player, from surgery scalpels to police speed sensors. Many are the uses and advantages of laser nowadays, thanks to its ability to cut the rougher metal and penetrate the darkest skies. In fact a laser of the same power of an heir dryer is enough to pass through a 3 cm steel sheet.

Unfortunately one of the main applications of laser is in military industry, where it’s fundamental to direct missiles and gun barrels.
Hopefully it’s also used on a big scale in medical field, thanks to its precision and concentrated energy: it’s used to destroy kidney stones, to make millimetric operations on eyes and brain and also to make skin smoother.

For the future the use of laser has good perspectives, as demonstrated by the several projects of free electrons laser, which allow to observe single atoms and moving particles (Radiation is produced by electrons pushed at light speed inside atom smashers).

But the last age of laser will be the universe: 192 machines extremely powerful, manufactured at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the US and able to reach for an instant 33 millions of degrees will soon point to a very small deuterium, with the aim of tuning on the Sun on Earth, which means that this laser should start a nuclear fusion reaction which could solve our energy problems in the future.

More infos about Laser cutting 2d on en.bettomacchine.it

Author: veronique

This author has published 4 articles so far.More info about the author is coming soon.

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